5.5miles/
9kms

T for three…and John Musgrave

About this route

The countryside between Torquay and Totnes in South Devon is a landscape of attractive valleys with a quiet and away-from-it-all atmosphere.

A perfect way of exploring this scenic area is to use the footpaths and tracks which are followed by two of Devon’s long walking routes. These two routes, the Totnes-Torquay Trail (or 3Ts for short) and the John Musgrave Heritage Trail meet at  Marldon, between Torquay and Totnes, and then becomes one  route.

This walk is a one-way length from Marldon to Totnes, using the regular and relatively frequent bus service between the two to take you from Totnes to the starting point at Marldon, a pleasant ride in its own right.

Getting Around

This walk starts in Marldon where there is limited car parking. It is recommended you park in Totnes and catch the bus to Marldon to begin your walk. Totnes is well served with buses from Torbay, Exeter and Plymouth. It is also on the national rail network, for the latest times visit www.travelinesw.com

Facilities
Totnes (all facilities) Marldon (village shop and pub).
Terrain
One short climb of 30 meters /100 feet and two longer, more gentle climbs of 30 meters /100 feet.
Accessibility
Explore more, click to download pdf
Download

Interesting information

Half way into the walk you will walk past Loventor Manor. This is an ancient settlement location, with its name coming from Leofwynne, the Saxon founder. The current house is late 16th century, with extra wings added over the years.

A little further on you will see Berry Pomeroy Castle through the trees.The de la Pomeroys were among the first Norman families to claim a barony in England in the 11th century. There is a public footpath which leads to the castle through the woods if you want to make a visit (there are limited seasonal facilities at the castle).

When you reach Totnes, you will enter a part of town called Bridgetown. It was first developed in medieval times by the de la Pomeroy family. The bridge was built in 1828 by Charles Fowler, a Devon architect who was responsible for Covent Garden in London.

You can explore more in this area