2.7miles/
4.3kms

Baggy Point

About this route

The SW Coast path out to a viewpoint at Baggy Point has been levelled and compacted to make access easier for everyone.

After the first 0.5 mile, the path is unsuitable for wheelchair use due to lack of passing places.

The higher path after this point involves some steeper gradients.

An excellent path has been upgraded to allow everyone to see the sweeping views and cliff-nesting seabirds.

Baggy Point ‘easy access walk’ route description can be found here.

Getting Around

The walk starts from the National Trust Baggy Point Car park close to the attractive village of Croyde in North Devon.

A shorter route for wheelchairs takes in the first 1.6km / 1.0 mile.

Facilities
Croyde - all facilities
Terrain
Tarmac path. Strenuous with steep gradient after 0.5 mile but it is definitely worth it!
Accessibility
Explore more, click to download pdf
Download

Interesting information

This walk takes in spectacular views of the dramatic coastline towards Bideford Bay and Hartland.  Children will love the whale bones and the old wreck post, as well as the rocks and cliffs.

In spring, nests on the cliffs among the clumps of pink thrift and spotted white sea campion and the gorse bushes are ablaze.  In autumn the migrant birds gathering ready to journey south can sometimes attract the attention of a predatory merlin, peregrine or even a haen harrier.

Crumbling stone walls dividing the ancient fields on the top of the headland are encrusted with lichen.

Photo of Ox-eye daisies on cliffs above the sea at Baggy Point
Baggy Point by Jemima Jewell

You can explore more in this area

Photo along the South Devon coast showing fields, coastal cliffs and sea with the Daymark in the distance
205miles/
329kms

South West Coast Path

Over the centuries fishermen, coastguards and smugglers have helped to create this historic path – now Britain’s longest National Trail
Photo of the top of a waymarking post for the Coast Path and Tarka Trail
163miles/
261kms

Tarka Trail walking route

Inspired by Henry Williamson’s much loved novel ‘Tarka the Otter’ which was based on real places, this 163 miles/261kms recreation